DifficultyBeginner

In 2020, in the midst of the pandemic, one of the few positives that emerged was the sourdough movement. Everyone was hopping on the sourdough train so to speak. Being celiac, however, it was not a train I had gotten on, well at least not in 2020. I had attempted to create natural gluten free sourdough about 6 years ago but I just wasn't happy with the results, so I put sourdough on hold. Enter 2021 and Idaho based Snactivist foods founder Joni Kindwall, who started a Gluten Free Sourdough Academy, where she taught the basic “how to's’ of GF sourdough making. Through Joni I was supplied with a GF sourdough starter and I learned some key fundamentals of making proper sourdough bread. As someone who does not like to waste anything, I also learned what I could do with the sourdough “discard”. These waffles emerged from a basic recipe from class and developed into my own recipe. Recently in January of 2022, I have developed my own sourdough starter from ivory teff flour. These waffles can be made from whatever sourdough discard you have in your kitchen, be it gluten free or otherwise. Every week I am able to make and freeze waffles. These waffles couldn't be any easier. They are a one bowl recipe. If you have a regular non gluten free sourdough just sub the same amount of your discard. You may need to increase or decrease the water. If you are looking to start your own gluten free sourdough journey, and live in the U.S. a starter can be ordered from snactivistfoods.com. In the future I will be sharing my own sourdough starter recipe that features 3 ingredients: ivory teff flour, fresh pear juice and filtered water.

The prep time includes time for the discard to "wake up" in the waffle batter. Since it is now March, nothing says spring more to me than the colour green and the emerging plum blossoms in my backyard. Vibrant green matcha is such a lovely healthy addition to waffles. I recommend Soar Organics matcha powder. It is of the highest quality and that really comes through in the taste and texture or what you are making. I recommend doubling the recipe depending on how much discard you have available and the size of your family. For an extra special and pretty treat add about 6 freeze dried raspberries to each waffle right after you pour the batter it into the waffle maker.

Save
Yields5 Servings
Prep Time25 minsCook Time15 minsTotal Time40 mins
 ½ cup gluten free sourdough starter discard(or use whatever sourdough discard you have available)
 ½ cup gluten free all purpose flour
 ½ tsp baking soda
 ¼ tsp baking powder
 ¼ tsp sea salt
 1 tbsp organic culinary matcha powder
 1 ½ tbsp coconut sugar
 ¼ cup unsweetened non dairy milk
 1 tsp apple cider vinegar or white vinegar
 ½ - 3/4 cup warm water
 1 ½ tbsp avocado oil
 freeze dried raspberries (about 6 per waffle)
1

Add sourdough discard to a medium bowl. Sift flour, baking soda, powder and sea salt and add to the discard and whisk vigorously. Stir in the coconut sugar. Sift the matcha powder over the batter and stir in.

2

Whisk in the milk and gradually whisk in the warm water, then vinegar and oil. If batter is too thick, add more water. However the batter should be quite thick. Whisk to get batter as smooth as possible. Set batter aside and let it sit for about 15-20 minutes.

3

Heat your waffle iron and spray with avocado oil cooking spray or brush with melted coconut oil. Use a 1/4 dry measuring cup to scoop out batter. I have a square 2 count waffle iron and I add about 1/3 cup (heaping 1/4 cup) of the batter to each of the waffles. If desired add freeze dried raspberries or strawberries to the batter. Close waffle lid and wait for iron to indicate they are cooked. Do not over-fill your waffle iron. Place the batter in the middle of each waffle and allow to cook. If you over-fill with batter the waffles will be soggy, rather than crispy.

4

Continue with remaining waffle batter. Enjoy! Extra waffles will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for several days or they can be frozen. Just pop them out and re-heat/toast in your toaster or toaster oven.

Ingredients

 ½ cup gluten free sourdough starter discard(or use whatever sourdough discard you have available)
 ½ cup gluten free all purpose flour
 ½ tsp baking soda
 ¼ tsp baking powder
 ¼ tsp sea salt
 1 tbsp organic culinary matcha powder
 1 ½ tbsp coconut sugar
 ¼ cup unsweetened non dairy milk
 1 tsp apple cider vinegar or white vinegar
 ½ - 3/4 cup warm water
 1 ½ tbsp avocado oil
 freeze dried raspberries (about 6 per waffle)

Directions

1

Add sourdough discard to a medium bowl. Sift flour, baking soda, powder and sea salt and add to the discard and whisk vigorously. Stir in the coconut sugar. Sift the matcha powder over the batter and stir in.

2

Whisk in the milk and gradually whisk in the warm water, then vinegar and oil. If batter is too thick, add more water. However the batter should be quite thick. Whisk to get batter as smooth as possible. Set batter aside and let it sit for about 15-20 minutes.

3

Heat your waffle iron and spray with avocado oil cooking spray or brush with melted coconut oil. Use a 1/4 dry measuring cup to scoop out batter. I have a square 2 count waffle iron and I add about 1/3 cup (heaping 1/4 cup) of the batter to each of the waffles. If desired add freeze dried raspberries or strawberries to the batter. Close waffle lid and wait for iron to indicate they are cooked. Do not over-fill your waffle iron. Place the batter in the middle of each waffle and allow to cook. If you over-fill with batter the waffles will be soggy, rather than crispy.

4

Continue with remaining waffle batter. Enjoy! Extra waffles will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for several days or they can be frozen. Just pop them out and re-heat/toast in your toaster or toaster oven.

Matcha Sourdough Waffles (GF Vegan )