DifficultyBeginner

Lilacs are one of my favourite flowers, their beautiful bouncy, perfumy blossoms epitomize late spring. I first heard about lilac juice or "syren saft" as it is called in Sweden, a number of years ago. Then I later saw a post by a fellow food blogger, Malin of "Fab Food Swede". I was inspired by her post to try to make my own version once the lilacs came in bloom. I don't have a lilac bush but my lovely neighbour does and she offered me her blossoms. I expected the lilac water to turn purple but it doesn't, however the water takes on the flavour of the lilacs. I would describe the lilac infused water as tasting like the lilacs smell. It is important, though a bit laborious, to remove the stems and little green bits from the lilac blossoms. I actually found this step relaxing. I sat in a chair in the shade of our backyard with a big bowl of lilac heads on my lap, watching the bees buzzing and pollenating while my pup Duncan rested under my chair. This is a great job for kids. If you do not remove most of the green bits it will affect the flavour in a negative way, so try your best to remove most of them. Prep time does not include the infusion time of soaking the blossoms in the water overnight. The lilac water will be enough to make a double batch of lemonade. You can store the extra lilac infused water in a glass jar until you are ready to make another batch of lemonade.

Yields4 Servings
Prep Time1 hrTotal Time1 hr
 4 lilac heads, stems and green bits removed
 9 cups filtered water
 2 large lemons, rind and white pith removed except for 1 inch strip of rind which you will not remove
 4 -5 tbsp maple syrup, raw honey, grape nectar, coconut nectar or liquid keto sweetener of your choiceIf using grape nectar increase to about 5 tbsp and I recommend using
 4 cups lilac infused water
1

Soak lilac blossoms in water overnight. Strain blossoms over a colander and reserve some of the blossoms to top your lemonade and compost the rest of the blossoms. Pour the strained lilac water and strain it again over a bowl or pitcher through a nut milk bag or cheesecloth. This will remove any small bits of debris or dirt.

2

Pour double strained lilac water into a blender. Add lemons and sweetener and power on high until your lemonade is frothy. Taste for sweetness and add extra sweetener if needed and whir briefly in blender. Pour lemonade into a small pitcher and top individual servings with blossoms.

Category,

Ingredients

 4 lilac heads, stems and green bits removed
 9 cups filtered water
 2 large lemons, rind and white pith removed except for 1 inch strip of rind which you will not remove
 4 -5 tbsp maple syrup, raw honey, grape nectar, coconut nectar or liquid keto sweetener of your choiceIf using grape nectar increase to about 5 tbsp and I recommend using
 4 cups lilac infused water

Directions

1

Soak lilac blossoms in water overnight. Strain blossoms over a colander and reserve some of the blossoms to top your lemonade and compost the rest of the blossoms. Pour the strained lilac water and strain it again over a bowl or pitcher through a nut milk bag or cheesecloth. This will remove any small bits of debris or dirt.

2

Pour double strained lilac water into a blender. Add lemons and sweetener and power on high until your lemonade is frothy. Taste for sweetness and add extra sweetener if needed and whir briefly in blender. Pour lemonade into a small pitcher and top individual servings with blossoms.

Lilac Lemonade (Refined Sugar Free)